M510 Use Case Inquiry

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  • Updated 1 year ago
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An existing manufacturing customer has a need to provide WIFI in a remote warehouse that they do not own.  This is a temporary/seasonal issue.  They do not want to invest in any infrastructure that is deemed to be permanent.  They also do not want to purchase internet connectivity that is deemed to be permanent either.  No DSL or cable modems.

They do think they can run some wiring.

Our initial idea is to use M510 with a cell phone connection out to the internet.  On the user side, we will have a small number of handheld bar code scanners running telnet or SSH apps.  Seems like a good use of the M510.

Couple questions:

1.  If we need more coverage than a single M510 can offer, what would be the preferred way of networking in more access points?  Wired or mesh?

2.  It does not appear that Unleashed is an option for the M510.  Is that accurate?

3. If no Unleashed, can I network more APs in by hand or do I need a controller?

4. Looking for any other concepts/ideas for a temporary location that is multiple access points in size.

The space is probably about 80 to 100,000 sqft.  The telnet clients are extremely light weight.  We do not expect any other clients on this connection.  Since it is telnet/ssh we need a signal everywhere but it can be quite degraded and still works ok.

This is an interesting problem but one that we feel has a lot of potential use with other customers if we can figure the design out.

Thanks,

Bob Brennan
IMS, Inc.
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Bob Brennan

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Posted 1 year ago

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Michael Thompson

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Bob, does the 100,000 sqft warehouse they rent have a high ceiling or low? What obstacles are in the way? Shelves made of metal that block full of contents, etc? Can they mount the unit high and is there power receptacles or a catwalk that could easily be accessed to reset/remove/place the unit? How many total devices/clients would be on the wireless (by your description it sounds light duty)? What is the budget? Would they be able to afford multiple units if the warehouse was densely populated with product/etc, possibly mesh a few to the LTE unit if needed?

Can you post a picture of the warehouse inside. Is it more like the first picture or second? Thanks!


 


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Bob Brennan

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I am comfortable that the customer has budget for multiple access points and a modest amount of infrastructure.  Power for the APs is a concern.  Using POE and running Ethernet is most likely a necessity.

Our company uses Ruckus Wireless hardware to supply factories and warehouses with connectivity.  It is pretty much all we do.  I am comfortable in what we would need to do if not for the new wrinkle of the M510.

The first warehouse has a high ceiling, limited racking and gaylord boxes stacked up to 3 high.  These boxes are a 4x4x4 foot heavy duty corrugated containers on a wooden pallet typically used to transport dry goods.  In this specific case, it will be plastic resin pellets.

I do not expect more then 6 users connected at this remote site at any on time.

My questions remain:

1.  If we need more coverage than a single M510 can offer, what would be the preferred way of networking in more access points?  Wired or mesh?

2.  It does not appear that Unleashed is an option for the M510.  Is that accurate?

3. If no Unleashed, can I network more APs in by hand or do I need a controller?

4. Looking for any other concepts/ideas for a temporary location that is multiple access points in size.

Thank you very much for the feedback!

Bob
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scott ren, Employee

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Michael Brado, Official Rep

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And in every warehouse installation I've worked on, where hand-held scanners run a Telnet or SSH application, they were VERY dependent on good signal (not degraded) and time sensitive...!
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Bob Brennan

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Sure, let's separate speed from signal quality.  Even at the lowest speeds for a durable wireless connection, you have more bandwidth available than SSH or telnet clients can use especially with tiny user counts.  We just need a constant and durable connection for this to work.  We do not need to guarantee every user full throttle bandwidth.

In the old days, we ran these sorts of systems over multiplexed dial up lines at 28.8 or 56 k.  That's why I think we can have half a dozen users share a cell modem to pull this off.  Do you agree?

I see in some other questions where some one has 21,000 sqft of office space and has 9 R710 deployed.  If that sort of density was a requirement in a factory warehouse, no one would implement WiFi.