Skip to main content

1 Message

 • 

70 Points

Fri, May 12, 2017 5:57 AM

Answered

What are the challenges for the Wi-Fi in moving vehicles (car, Bus/shuttle)?

What are the challenges for the Wi-Fi in moving vehicles (car, Bus/shuttle)? What are the parameters to calculate the possible drop in signal receiving? Will any packets get dropped when moving fast? How the Doppler Effect works here?

Responses

Brand User

2.6K Messages

 • 

44.8K Points

3 years ago

Please discuss your requirements with your local VAR or Ruckus SE.
Brand User

2.6K Messages

 • 

44.8K Points

3 years ago

Please discuss your requirements with your local VAR or Ruckus SE.

1 Message

3 years ago

        In order to provide the Wi-Fi access, there has to be a way to keep the routers connected to the internet. This is usually done by using an LTE connection. However, various operators have different presence, meaning it is usually a good idea to use a few different SIM cards in order to control the customer traffic and maintain the highest quality of service. Using a satellite is also an option, but becomes more problematic at higher speed, passenger count and terrain obstacles.

  The location of the LTE antenna is very important. It should be situated as close to the roof as possible, preferably on top of it. The signal does not easily pass through metal structures, so positioning it correctly might prove difficult. It is more likely while installing a Wi-Fi network in a train, since they are made of different materials than buses or cars, making them more prone to causing interference. They are also significantly longer, so they require a larger number of devices to operate. Check for essay writing service reviews

333 Messages

 • 

5.1K Points

3 years ago

Like everything in Wi-Fi network design height is key and if you have enough height to get a good footprint then roaming at speed is no issue at all.

Note: client choice is also key to roaming success!!

Applying the basic roaming network designs principles of tunnelling the traffic, and ensuring you have a good cell overlap, to accommodate the client travelling at speed, would be a good place to start.

As Mike has said above already, you really need to talk to your VAR or Ruckus SE so they can give you better advice in terms of supporting your network requriements and ensuring that you get a network that suits your business needs.

Good Luck

:)

1 Message

 • 

60 Points

3 years ago

Simultaneous user limitations. Generic systems are designed to sustain five or 10 users at once, when a commercial bus may carry 60 people or more. A single rider may connect three devices, thus utilizing most available channels.
    Power failures. If a system isn’t designed for moving vehicles, it will likely suffer frequent power spikes, which tend to require system resetting. Beyond the hassle of constantly finagling with too-basic Wi-Fi equipment is the fact that, for union or policy reasons, many bus drivers are not allowed to touch electric components.
    Poor Antenna Connections. Typically, mobile Wi-Fi systems see the best performance with roof-mounted antennas. However, most low-end mobile Wi-Fi systems do not accommodate roof mounting, and those that do, require a tricky USB card connection that tends to disconnect frequently.
    Limited Carrier Accessibility. Lower-end Wi-Fi configurations are single-carrier, single-SIM-card systems. Crossing a country line or moving into a certain carrier’s dead zone could interrupt access.
    No Fleet-wide Software. Without a single system overseeing performance, it’s very difficult to implement effective Wi-Fi access. Centralized software is a must-have for managers overseeing dozens of vehicles simultaneously. Basic systems can’t provide a bird’s eye view of Wi-Fi operation.
Brand User

2.6K Messages

 • 

44.8K Points

Don't add/throw SPAM into forum conversations DavidJohn2121, or you will be banned.
I edited it out of your above reply.  Thanks.